Archive for ‘Madison’

January 6, 2013

Sayre House

The Revolutionary-era Sayre House in Madison, NJ!

Clearly this is out of season, but the house still looks pretty much like this. (I imagine. I haven’t actually been there recently. Maybe a tree fell on it.)

BUT ANYWAY.

The Sayre House was built around 1745! That’s old.

According to legend, perpetuated by a couple of signs on the front of the house, General Anthony Wayne (“Mad Anthony”) occupied the house in 1777 while the continental army was encamped nearby, and Reverend James Caldwell stopped by now and then too.

Sayre Homestead, headquarters of General Anthony Wayne. This house was occupied by General Anthony Wayne while the Continental army was encamped in Loantaka Valley, 1777. Placed by Loantaka Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, October 22, 1936.

Sayre Homestead
Headquarters of General Anthony Wayne
This house was occupied by General Anthony Wayne while the Continental army was encamped in Loantaka Valley, 1777.
Placed by Loantaka Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution
October 22, 1936.

 

 

Sayre House Built about 1745, was the headquarters of Gen. Anthony Wayne in 1777. Rev. James Caldwell was frequent visitor here.

Sayre House
Built about 1745, was the headquarters of Gen. Anthony Wayne in 1777. Rev. James Caldwell was frequent visitor here.

 

The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

And then I came along and took its picture in 2012.

AND THERE IT IS.

 

References:

Cunningham, J.T. (1998). Images of America: Madison. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH. ISBN 0738537802.

Daughters of the American Revolution, Loantaka Chapter. (1936). “Sayre Homestead, Headquarters of General Anthony Wayne.” (Sign marker). Documented September 2012.

Frazza, A. (2012). Revolutionary War New Jersey: A photographic field guide to New Jersey’s role in the Revolutionary War! “Revolutionary War sites in Madison, New Jersey.” http://www.revolutionarywarnewjersey.com/new_jersey_revolutionary_war_sites/towns/madison_nj_revolutionary_war_sites.htm.

State of New Jersey (n.d.). “Sayre House.” (Sign marker). Documented September 2012.

Wikipedia. (2012). “Sayre House.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayre_House.

July 14, 2012

Madison library – 3

Inside the Madison Library

This is what the inside of the Madison Public Library looks like! How exciting is that.

Well, actually, I took this photo last year (2011), and just realized I’d processed it but never posted it. So maybe it doesn’t look like this anymore! But it probably does.

In case you can’t access their website, Madison Public Library hours are, as of July 2012:
Monday-Wednesday 10:00am – 9pm
Thursday-Friday 10:00am – 6:00 pm
Saturday 10:00am – 5:00pm
Sunday (Winter) 2:00pm – 5:00pm
Sunday (Summer) Closed

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September 29, 2011

Masons in Madison

To be a Freemason you need to be (1) male and (2) worship a higher power. Wellllll, I'm out.

I was going through some old photos, and I came across this drive-by shot of a Masonic Lodge in Madison.

Something seemed vaguely familiar about it, so I leafed through my historical text on Madison.

Oh and there's a building behind that tree. FYI.

It’s the old 1825 Presbyterian Church!

According to the Freemason’s own website:

When the Presbyterian Church moved to larger quarters on Green Avenue, Madison Lodge purchased the building at 170 Main Street, renovated the interior and have met there since 1931 utilizing furniture from the early days on Waverly Place [the first meeting place of the group] and benches from the church.

How ’bout that. Apparently they’ve chopped down that obstructive tree, too.

 

Reference:

Cunningham, J.T. (1998). Images of America: Madison. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH. ISBN 0738537802.

Madison Lodge #93, F. & A.M. (n.d.). “Freemasonry in Madison.” http://www.madisonlodge93.com/MadisonFreemasonary.htm.

June 6, 2011

Railroad bridge!

Look at those arches. Pretty pretty pretty!

Railroad tracks ran through Madison from 1838 onwards, but by 1913, automobiles were pretty common. Trains blocked traffic as they ran through town, creating huge jams. The townspeople rallied and cried, “Something must be done!” (Probably with pitchforks.)

What a jam!

So in 1913 (or 1914), they started raising the tracks so trains wouldn’t interfere with traffic. They made a two-mile long, 75-foot-deep cut towards the east side of town, and they took those 600,000 cubic yards of dirt west to build the main elevation through Madison.

Bwidge!

The new elevation, complete with its fancy new bridges like this one, was pretty much ready by 1915 or 1916.

 
Reference:
Cunningham, John T. (1998). Images of America: Madison. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH.

May 31, 2011

This is the church and this is the… bell tower

Red and bricky

Adjacent to/ possibly on Drew’s campus, this was Madison’s second Methodist church. The congregation formed in 1843, and the original structure (not this one) was built in 1844.

Since Drew continues to be (at least in part) a seminary school, maybe young ministers train here. But I have no verification for this.

May 30, 2011

The Brittin Building isn’t British.

Oh those Brittins.

Y’know, I can’t find any information on this building. The Brittins were one of those wealthy and well-known families in Madison, and presumably a Brittin provided most of the funds to build this building on Main Street, but beyond that, I got nothin’.

And here’s what it looked like in the late 1890s. (See below.)

Brittin Building, 1890s

May 27, 2011

Creamy creamy.

McCool's is so cool.

It’s ice cream season again! I think pretty much every town has its own unique ice cream parlor (at least one). This one is in Madison.

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May 26, 2011

Grace! Episcopal!

Gracie dearie.

Like most congregations, the congregation of Madison’s Grace Episcopal Church initially met in private homes and public halls. I don’t know the date this church was built, but I suspect it was in the mid-1800s.

…yyyyyyep.

May 20, 2011

Diners! in Madison?

Nautilus Diner!

The Nautilus Diner in Madison (above) is built on the site of the old Madison Diner (below).

Madison Diner! c. 1950s?

The Goumas family initially started the Madison Diner in 1926 from their own home. And… it was called Goumas’s Diner, unsurprisingly.

 
References:
Cunningham, John T. (1998). Images of America: Madison. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH.

May 18, 2011

R is for Railway station

Mmmmmadison rrrrrrailway station.

I work in a New York office, and I’m known as the employee who lives in Jersey. When my manager had to visit Madison for a client, she came back and told me the Madison train station was really beautiful, and asked if all NJ Transit stations were like that.

Answer: no.

Yeah, New Providence doesn't have staircases.

While Madison was elevating its tracks, William Haynes Truesdale, president of the Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western Railroad (formerly known as the Morris & Essex, but also known as the DL&W or “Delay, Linger, and Wait”), said that stations being built ought to be compatible with surrounding architecture. Because Madison is home to Drew University, the style of the station is collegiate Gothic; because Madison was an affluent and generous town, they raised wayyy more money for the construction of this station than other towns raised for theirs, and it is fancy indeed.

Madison station, 2011

Madison station, 1916

It was finished in 1916, and it’s been registered on the State and National Registers of Historic Places since 1984! The Gladstone-line shacks don’t have those kinds of bragging rights.

(P.S. Here’s a map of the line, in case you don’t remember where Gladstone or Madison are!)

NJ Transit, Morris-Essex Line + Gladstone Branch. Can you find Madison?

 
References:
Cunningham, John T. (1998). Images of America: Madison. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH.

National Registers of Historic Places. (n.d.) Information board near door of station. Sponsored by NJ Transit: Madison, NJ.

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