Archive for ‘Sea Girt’

February 28, 2013

Badges

Beach badges, Sea Girt

I’m probably the worst Shore-born person to try to explain beach badges, because I don’t remember ever owning or using one. (I only go to the beach during off-seasons, or after dark. My mother and I gave up our Annual Trek to the Beach™ sometime in the mid-1990s.)

As far as I know, beach badges are little… badges… with a pin… that proclaim you’re a paying beach customer. Some are daily passes, some are seasonal passes… you know.

What I find interesting is how little they’ve changed over the years. This particular display started with 1948 and went through to 2001; all the badges consistently used the same little squiggly pin.

December 27, 2012

Lighthouse lights

Light bulbs in the Sea Girt lighthouse

In the northeast, we’re getting hit with some ugly wintry-mix weather (tho’ not nearly as bad as the system that hit you guys out west— ouch), and neither I nor my camera have the constitution to go take pictures of it.

So instead: you know what lousy stormy wintry-mix weather puts me in mind of? WARM SUNNY BEACHES.

…Of course, New Jersey’s warm sunny beaches all got washed away, which puts me in an entirely different state of mind, but that’s another story.

Anyway, the week before Sandy, I had the chance to climb up Sea Girt lighthouse.

Docents at the lighthouse were careful to explain that Sea Girt didn’t have a working light.
Some of us, confused, replied that we’d SEEN the light from Sea Girt lighthouse at night, it DID have a light, WTF.
The docents scoffed and said that yes, it had a sort of wimpy light source, but that light source didn’t actually DO anything. You can’t see the light from the SEA or anything.

So: the wimpy light from Sea Girt lighthouse is provided by this here setup: two 100-watt lightbulbs and a small prism.

For context, lighthouse lights are usually refracted by huuuuuuuuuuge prisms that… I dunno, focus the beams, I guess.

Here’s what the Fresnel lens inside Sandy Hook light looks like:

Sandy Hook light

And Sea Girt light’s museum has an example of the sort of Fresnel lens that was inside the lighthouse originally:

Sea Girt light's Fresnel lens. I wonder if it survived Hurricane Sandy? They paid an awful lot of money for that thing.

I guess it’s a fourth-order lens, which apparently refers to the size, and fourth-order is on the smallish side.

November 4, 2012

Shorelines

Ocean Grove Boardwalk, October 31, 2012

Right now, here’s the deal:

  1. I’m not a real reporter.
  2. Gas is hard to come by.
  3. Unnecessary trips to drive around and “look” at local towns seem frivolous.

 

So here are some other photographers’ photos of what these towns look like now (plus some of my old outdated photos, ‘cos I’ve been photographing the shore for years).

Avon by the Sea; me; March 2008 Avon by the Sea; Ashley Peskoe, NJ.com; October 2012
Avon by the Sea; me; March 2008 Avon by the Sea; Ashley Peskoe, NJ.com; October 2012
   
   
Asbury Park (Zombie Walk); me; October 6, 2012 Asbury Park; Rob Spahr, NJ.com; October 30, 2012
Asbury Park; me; October 6, 2012 Asbury Park; Rob Spahr, NJ.com; October 30, 2012
   
   
Belmar; me; March 2008 Belmar; Bob Bielk, Asbury Park Press; October 2012
Belmar; me; March 2008 Belmar; Bob Bielk, Asbury Park Press; October 2012
   
   
Sandy Hook bike path; me; August 2009 Sandy Hook; Mark R. Sullivan, Asbury Park Press; November 2012
Sandy Hook bike path and Hartshorne Drive; me; August 2009 Sandy Hook bike path; Mark R. Sullivan, Asbury Park Press; November 2012
   
   
Sea Girt; me; June 2008 Sea Girt; Bob Bielk, Asbury Park Press; October 2012
Sea Girt; me; June 2008 Sea Girt; Bob Bielk, Asbury Park Press; October 2012
October 20, 2012

New Jersey Lighthouse Challenge

Sea Girt Light, July 2007

Sea Girt Light: the last live-in lighthouse built on the East Coast. Photo from 2007. Originally posted here.

 

This is all outside of my “radius,” but it’s very New Jersey:

This weekend (October 20-21) marks the 2012 New Jersey Lighthouse Challenge!

Sandy Hook Light!

Sandy Hook Light: Oldest working lighthouse in the United States. Photo from 2007. Originally posted here.

 

The goal is visit all 13 land-based lighthouses scattered around the state, climb them, and collect some token that verifies that you were there. Seems easy enough, right?

‘Cept New Jersey is bordered by water on three sides, and even though it’s a small-ish state, it’s a lot longer than people think. This is not an adventure for wusses.

Twin Lights!

Navesink Twin Lights: first American lighthouse to test a Fresnel lens. Photo from 2009.

 

For those of us who are perhaps a wee bit less ambitious, it’s still a great opportunity to support our local lighthouses. The lighthouses are open all day, so you can, y’know, stop by and climb a couple. Or at least stand back, admire them from afar, and say “gosh darn it, what a nifty state I live in.”

 

 

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