Posts tagged ‘houses of worship’

December 12, 2011

Saint Peter’s

Check it out, I finally used Photoshop's panorama tool!

What what, look who finally used Photoshop’s panorama tool! (Me, that’s who. It was still crazy distorted, but it saved me 15 minutes of alignment.)

So THIS is St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Morristown.

Saint Peter's Church: The churches of Medieval England inspired the design of this Gothic Revival edifice by architects McKim, Mead, and White. Built 1887-1911, it replaced an 1828 structure. Features include English stained glass, a 49-bell carillon, a rood screen of Spanish design, a Skinner organ, and a Tiffany window.

A sign in front of the church says (plus some Wikipedia links):

The churches of Medieval England inspired the design of this Gothic Revival edifice by architects McKim, Mead, and White. Built 1887-1911, it replaced an 1828 structure. Features include English stained glass, a 49-bell carillon, a rood screen of Spanish design, a Skinner organ, and a Tiffany window.

(Side note: I keep thinking that McKim, Mead, and White comes up all the time, but this is only the second time I’ve mentioned the firm on this blog. Huh. Must’ve read something somewhere.)

Now, most buildings are built over the course of, ohhh, I don’t know, two or three years, right? And so perhaps you read the blockquote above and thought to yourself, ‘wait a minute… it took 24 years to build this church? Really?’

Yeah, really, that’s not a typo. The church stipulated that “no stone would be put in place until it was paid for,” so construction only happened as slowly as the funds rolled in.

If you want information on current church goings-ons, check out St. Peter’s website.

 

Reference:
Morris County Heritage Commision, New Jersey Register of Historic Places, and National Register of Historical Places. (n.d.). “Saint Peter’s Church.” (Sign marker). Documented October 2011.

Morristown Partnership. (2011?). “Morristown’s History.” http://www.morristown-nj.org/history_cont.html

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September 29, 2011

Masons in Madison

To be a Freemason you need to be (1) male and (2) worship a higher power. Wellllll, I'm out.

I was going through some old photos, and I came across this drive-by shot of a Masonic Lodge in Madison.

Something seemed vaguely familiar about it, so I leafed through my historical text on Madison.

Oh and there's a building behind that tree. FYI.

It’s the old 1825 Presbyterian Church!

According to the Freemason’s own website:

When the Presbyterian Church moved to larger quarters on Green Avenue, Madison Lodge purchased the building at 170 Main Street, renovated the interior and have met there since 1931 utilizing furniture from the early days on Waverly Place [the first meeting place of the group] and benches from the church.

How ’bout that. Apparently they’ve chopped down that obstructive tree, too.

 

Reference:

Cunningham, J.T. (1998). Images of America: Madison. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH. ISBN 0738537802.

Madison Lodge #93, F. & A.M. (n.d.). “Freemasonry in Madison.” http://www.madisonlodge93.com/MadisonFreemasonary.htm.

September 19, 2011

Chatham Methodist!

Chatham Methodist

This is the Chatham United Methodist Church [website].

The congregation was established in 1786. In 1898 (ded. 1899), the moved to the church (and parsonage) below, on Center Street. (These buildings no longer exist.)

Chatham Methodist church and parsonage, date unknown. Mid 20th century, I'm guessing? That's a wild guess, though.

In 1956, the congregation moved into its present location (see top photo), and the (modern, angular, glass) sanctuary was completed in 1962.

It’s right next to the Chatham Middle School on Main Street. More than once, I’ve turned into the church’s parking lot instead of the middle school’s. &$#!^*.

 

References:
Chatham United Methodist Church. (n.d.) “CUMC history.” http://www.chathamumc.com/history.html.

Cunningham, J.T. (1997). Images of America: Chatham. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH. ISBN 0738545619.

September 13, 2011

St. Luke’s Reformed Episcopal!

Saint Luke's, yo.

According to Gonczlik and Coddington (1998), St. Luke’s Reformed Episcopal Church in New Providence [website] was not built in New Providence. It was built in the Ohio Valley and brought here on a railroad flatcar in 1891!

St. Luke’s own website, however, makes no mention of this. According to them, the date of 1891 refers just to a small non-churchy-looking building (which may or may not have been prefabricated).

Totally snagged from St. Luke's website. Sorry, Higher Powers.

The bell tower, new sanctuary, and exterior remodeling (basically everything that makes a church look like a church) were all added later.

Here’s a photo of it after the bell tower was added but before it was painted white (or during a period when the white paint had gone to crap). I don’t know the date.

St. Luke's Episcopal, New Providence, date unknown

 

Reference:

Gonczlik, J. and Coddington, J. (1998). Images of America: New Providence. Arcadia Publishing: Charleston, SC. ISBN 0738565210.

Saint Luke’s Reformed Episcopal Church. (2005). “About us.” http://www.stlukesrecnj.org/aboutus.htm.

September 4, 2011

All Saints’.

Calling All Saints

The All Saints’ Episcopal Church of Scotch Plains [website] was originally built in 1882. It’s had a lot of additions since then (including the parish house, portico, and entrance).

All Saints' Episcopal, Scotch Plains, 1950

I couldn’t get a nice photo like this ‘cos what was a teeny twig of a sapling in 1950 is a giant obstructive tree in 2011.

It’s a very darkly beautiful church, I think.

Reference:

Bousquet, R. and Bousquet, S. (1995). Images of America: Scotch Plains and Fanwood. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH. ISBN 0738563188.

The Joint Digital Archives of Fanwood & Scotch Plains, New Jersey.(dates various). “Religious sites: All Saints’ Episcopal Church.” http://www.thejointlibrary.org/archives/ephemera.

September 2, 2011

Saint Andrew’s Episcopal

St. Andrew's of New Providence

St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in New Providence [website] was started by New Providencians from Calvary Church in Summit. In November 1959, they bought a plot of land with an old house; by Christmas 1960, a sanctuary had been built off the porch of the old house.

(This kind of explains why it’s set back so far from the road; I had to trespass a bit to get these photos.)

Side view.

A fair amount of its funding comes from its school, which began as a child care program sometime in the 1960s and has remained a well-respected “Harvard of nursery schools.”

 

Reference:

Hodgkins, M. (2010). “History of St. Andrew’s.” St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. http://www.standrewschurch.org/history.shtml

August 21, 2011

Another Baptist church

Look a church

The First Baptist Church in Millburn was built around 1859.

MIllburn First Baptist, date unknown

I’ve complained about trees obstructing architecture, but sometimes, you happen upon a building AFTER its big tree obstruction was cut down. While I hate to see trees go, it does make my job a lot easier!

…I say “job” like I’m getting paid to do this. ::eyeroll::

 

Reference:

Lampe, O.W. (1999, 2000). Images of America: Millburn. Arcadia Publishing: Charleston, SC. ISBN 0738504130.

August 14, 2011

Fanwood Presbyterian

Fanwood Presbyterian

Fanwood Presbyterian Church [website] was built in 1933.

Fanwood Presbyterian, c. 1940?

(It has undergone a few additions.)

The bell has some history, too. According to a plaque by its main entrance,

The bell in this belfry [was] formerly the Fanwood fire alarm. [It] was presented to Fanwood Presbyterian Church in August 1949 by the Fanwood Fire Company as a memorial to all Fanwood firemen.

A plaque!

Fanwood Presbyterian has also been the (temporary) home of the Jewish Temple Sholom [website] since 2003, which I think is pretty cool. Yay interfaith tolerance! Here’s what Temple Sholom has to say about the coexistence:

In July of 2003, the Fanwood Presbyterian Church graciously opened its doors to the congregation. (A late favor returned – as one of the founding members of Temple Sholom had donated the land to build the Church.) Offices were constructed in the Church’s main building. For religious worship, the Church’s Dining Room was reimagined as the Temple Sholom Chapel. A series of programs, including pulpit exchanges and a “Worship Together Weekend” helped strengthen the relationship between the two congregations (Temple Shalom, n.d., “In July of 2003,” para. 3 from bottom)

Getting along is nice and all, but Temple Sholom is supposedly moving into its own new building soon.

Reference:

Bousquet, R. and Bousquet, S. (1995). Images of America: Scotch Plains and Fanwood. Arcadia Publishing: Dover, NH. ISBN 0738563188.

Temple Shalom: Scotch Plains, NJ. (n.d.). “The history of Temple Shalom.” http://sholomnj.org/node/5

August 13, 2011

Rectory

Rectory!

This creepy beat-up house is the rectory of St. Stephen’s in Millburn. It was built in 1868-69, and it’s surrounded by an iron fence and a lot of trees. It’s still pretty neat-looking, I think!

St. Stephen's Rectory, date unknown (1960s?)

I am quickly realizing that architectural photos are better taken in the dead of winter. Leafy trees obstruct EVERYTHING!

 

Reference:

Lindsley, J.E. (1961). A History of St. Stephen’s Church: Millburn, New Jersey , 1851-1963. Rector, Wardens and Vestrymen of St. Stephen’s Church: Millburn, NJ. http://www.ststephensmillburn.org/church/history/history_1851_1963.htm.

August 12, 2011

St. Stephen’s Episcopal

St. Stephen's! For some reason, "St. James' Infirmary" keeps playing through my head.

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church [website] is an American Gothic church in Millburn. Construction began in 1853, and the building was consecrated in 1855.

St. Stephen's, from the back. Or maybe it's the front.

It has, like almost all still-standing buildings of that period, had some additions and renovations.

A woodcut of St. Stephen's.

A full history of the church can be found here, and historical reminiscences can be found here. (I have a short attention span, and I am not going to fully read and recapitulate them at this time.)

 

Reference:

Lampe, O.W. (1999, 2000). Images of America: Millburn. Arcadia Publishing: Charleston, SC. ISBN 0738504130.

Lindsley, J.E. (1961). A History of St. Stephen’s Church: Millburn, New Jersey , 1851-1963. Rector, Wardens and Vestrymen of St. Stephen’s Church: Millburn, NJ. http://www.ststephensmillburn.org/church/history/history_1851_1963.htm.

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