Cannonball!

The Cannon Ball House in Springfield, NJ!

The Cannon Ball House in Springfield was:

  • Built in either 1741 or 1761 (the second date is currently favored) by Dr. Jonathan Dayton
  • Originally a farmstead
  • Used as a hospital by the British during the Battle of Springfield in 1780
  • Pierced by a cannonball in its west wall during the Battle of Springfield (hence the name “Cannon Ball House”)
  • Operated as a tavern, briefly
  • A residence again, for many many years
  • The home of the Springfield Historical Society (and still is, ever since 1953)
  • Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977 (as the Hutchings Homestead)

Here’s what it looked like in the early 1900s:
Springfield NJ Cannon Ball House, circa 1900

 

In case you’re wondering why I keep misspelling “cannonball,” it’s because I’m using the spelling on the sign out front.

Cannon Ball House, see, it says so right there.

 

Also in case you’re wondering, two of my references were bronze plaques nailed near the front door:
Plaques!

 

Just to confuse things, there’s another historical Osborne Cannonball House in nearby Scotch Plains (also Union County), which was ALSO built c.1760, and ALSO pierced by a cannonball during the Revolutionary War. This is NOT that house.

 

References:

New Jersey State Chapter: Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America. (1957). “The Cannonball House.” (Sign marker). Documented April 2012.

Sanfranman59. (Last edit April 3, 2012). “National Register of Historic Places listings in Union County, New Jersey.” Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Registered_Historic_Places_in_Union_County,_New_Jersey.

Turner, J. and Koles, R.T. (2004). Images of America: Springfield. Arcadia Publishing: Charleston, SC. ISBN 0738536180.

United States Department of the Interior (n.d.). “National Register of Historic Places.” (Sign marker). Documented April 2012.

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