Saint Peter’s

Check it out, I finally used Photoshop's panorama tool!

What what, look who finally used Photoshop’s panorama tool! (Me, that’s who. It was still crazy distorted, but it saved me 15 minutes of alignment.)

So THIS is St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Morristown.

Saint Peter's Church: The churches of Medieval England inspired the design of this Gothic Revival edifice by architects McKim, Mead, and White. Built 1887-1911, it replaced an 1828 structure. Features include English stained glass, a 49-bell carillon, a rood screen of Spanish design, a Skinner organ, and a Tiffany window.

A sign in front of the church says (plus some Wikipedia links):

The churches of Medieval England inspired the design of this Gothic Revival edifice by architects McKim, Mead, and White. Built 1887-1911, it replaced an 1828 structure. Features include English stained glass, a 49-bell carillon, a rood screen of Spanish design, a Skinner organ, and a Tiffany window.

(Side note: I keep thinking that McKim, Mead, and White comes up all the time, but this is only the second time I’ve mentioned the firm on this blog. Huh. Must’ve read something somewhere.)

Now, most buildings are built over the course of, ohhh, I don’t know, two or three years, right? And so perhaps you read the blockquote above and thought to yourself, ‘wait a minute… it took 24 years to build this church? Really?’

Yeah, really, that’s not a typo. The church stipulated that “no stone would be put in place until it was paid for,” so construction only happened as slowly as the funds rolled in.

If you want information on current church goings-ons, check out St. Peter’s website.

 

Reference:
Morris County Heritage Commision, New Jersey Register of Historic Places, and National Register of Historical Places. (n.d.). “Saint Peter’s Church.” (Sign marker). Documented October 2011.

Morristown Partnership. (2011?). “Morristown’s History.” http://www.morristown-nj.org/history_cont.html

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One Comment to “Saint Peter’s”

  1. Yep, I would have believed it was English. Never thought of using panorama vertically, neat idea.

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