Old Town Hall

Old Town Hall

This is Summit’s old town hall, as evidenced by its cornerstone…
Town Hall/ P.W. Page, J.A. Hicks, J.H. Kelly; Township Committee / D.F. O'Rourke, Builder / Cady [8?] Brewer, Arght's / A.D. 1892

…and its front door…
Old Town Hall, now the Suburban Chambers of Commerce

…and this etching from sometime in the early 1900s.
Standing alone

According to Glimpses into Summit’s Past, this building was:

…’one of the prettiest public buildings in New Jersey’ when erected in 1892-93 from plans by John N. Cady, a popular local architect who designed many of Summit’s landmark buildings in that era. It was built for a total of $12,000, and comprised a meeting room on the first floor, a fireman’s room on the second floor, a jail in the rear, and housing for the engine and horses of Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 on the left.

…In 1909, the city bought Chester C. Henry’s Colonial Hall… for the Council chambers and the police and fire departments, and in 1946 the school building… was remodeled into the present Municipal Building.

The building is currently home to Summit’s Suburban Chambers of Commerce, but was previously the Board of Health Building. (And some time before that, the Town Hall, obviously.)

 
 
Vintage illustration and information from:
The Summit Historical Society. (1978). Glimpses into Summit’s past: A selection of photographs and texts tracing the city’s growth. Benway, Maxwell & Smith: Chatham, NJ. 43.

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3 Comments to “Old Town Hall”

  1. Nice: a one-stop shop for nearly all the city services. More Cady here: “SUMMIT’S CASINO CLUB.; Attractive Features of a Comparatively Young Organization.” http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F50915F7345D15738DDDA80994DE405B8485F0D3

  2. Nice: a one-stop shop for nearly all the city services. More Cady of Cady & Brewer here: “SUMMIT’S CASINO CLUB.; Attractive Features of a Comparatively Young Organization.” http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F50915F7345D15738DDDA80994DE405B8485F0D3
    It’d be interesting to find out more about the builder. Can’t read that on the cornerstone: Does it spell “P. F. O’Rourke”? Wonder if he’s related to the famous architect/builder/contractor firm of Jeremiah O’Rourke & Sons of Newark, New Jersey, and New York City. Probably not since Jeremiah lived until 1915 and his sons in the industry were William P. O’Rourke, Joseph B. O’Rourke, and Louis J. O’Rourke. No P.Fs or D.Fs among them.

    • Here is what the plaque says, as far as I could figure out:

      Town Hall
      P.W. Page, J.A. Hicks, J.H. Kelly; Township Committee
      D.F. O’Rourke, Builder
      Cady [8?] Brewer, Arght’s
      A.D. 1892

      So yeah, probably not close.

      Neat article, though.

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